Autumn News

I recently made the decision to delete my Facebook page. I’ve thought about it for some time and have deactivated it for short periods in the past. This time, I am done. Already I feel a difference–a little more at peace. October was the perfect month for me to let go. I love October–that perfect blend of the last of the sunny days, the beginning of chilly nights, some much-needed rain that can be appreciated now (we will get tired of it in a few months here in the Northwest!). The colors are beautiful, nature is bountiful. It’s a time for a last burst of work in the garden, and then we turn inward–to cozy homes, cats on laps, good books, family gatherings, and introspection at the winter solstice.

Our year was full of ups and downs, as most are. For us, the last few years have seemed to bring far more downs, but there have still been good times. We did quite a bit of visiting this summer–two weddings, a small family reunion, a lovely trip to Alaska thanks to my wonderful Mom. We saw lots of family and some very dear friends who might as well be family!

At home, it was a quieter summer. I am still recovering from a shoulder injury in May so there wasn’t much in the way of hiking and very little kayaking. We had a particularly hot and smoky summer in western Washington, which also made for a little less adventuring. Our garden was mixed–decent on the veggie side though not as productive as last year’s, but pretty good for my calendula and chamomile crop (which, along with the nasturtiums, are still blooming).

We’ve finally been able to get out and about locally the last two months for some easy hikes, a light paddle, and some successful foraging for berries, apples, rose hips, and huckleberries. We found a great place for U-pick corn. Our freezer is full of goodies! There is something so immensely satisfying about a freezer full of food from your own garden and woodlands.

I’ll close with a few photos from October outings. On to November!

Of Knees and Trees and Too Much Rain

Way overdue for a post here, but I have to admit, I’ve been a bit grouchy. I don’t want to complain too much, because my Midwest and East Coast friends have had it way worse, but I am tired of our very wet, cool spring here in the NW. I don’t know why–we’ve been here for almost 30 years, but this spring has been mentally tough as well. Still going through challenges with Jim’s job/non-job. There needs to come a time when one must just move on, but then something comes up that gives hope. The back and forth makes planning for the future difficult; but then, that’s what this blog was supposed to be all about. How to deal with changes you were not expecting.

Along with the monetary challenges of a much-reduced income, we are starting to feel old. We can still do all the things we used to do, for the most part (I will never kneeboard again, but didn’t care for it much in the first place!), but we no longer recover quite as quickly. Last November, I had a fall due to a startled cat and possible overconsumption of wine. My knee was just starting to recover when we had a nice week of weather and decided to order 12 yards of dirt for our eco-lawn and gardening projects. After moving 11 yards of the dirt (half of it by myself) and then replanting 32 raspberry plants that our neighbor didn’t want (Jim had to dig them all up first), my other knee decided it was only fair for it to have time off as well. So much for spring hikes of any length or difficulty! At least, in this case, the bad weather has helped. I have not felt the need to venture out in one of the wettest Aprils in Washington’s recorded history.

We have managed a few shorter and/or easier ventures that have been quite enjoyable.

We’ve gone back to Bloedel (my mission is to go once a month–next visit is this Friday).  After two visits I am already thankful for having purchased the yearly membership. Such a lovely, peaceful place.

We made two other trips before the last rainstorm hit–one up the North Shore of Hood Canal to DeWatto and another to the Rocky Bay Conservation Area. The DeWatto trip was more of a leisurely scenic drive than hike, but perfect for my injured self. We first stopped at Menard’s Landing and then took the back road to DeWatto. Who knew we had our own ‘road to Hana’???? Complete with scary turns, cliffs, and grouchy locals, but not nearly as long or as crowded. We came home the easy way, past Tahuya. The DeWatto campground was closed for camping but we were able to walk around the campground and along the river. We hope to go back and kayak on the bay this summer.

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Our next mini-adventure was Rocky Bay Conservation Area. This was a pretty, easy hike that’s close by Belfair, Gig Harbor, and Port Orchard. Several people were out with their dogs, as it was a lovely day. We met one woman who paints rocks and hides them along the trail for the kids (and us adults!) to enjoy. Saw some salmon fry in the creek. The only drawback for this site is no bathroom. Still, I was able to enjoy this hike with little knee pain.

Today the rain finally let up and I was able to get back in the yard. Planted potatoes in old grain sacks (my recycling project for the day), and pulled bunches of alders and scotch broom. We had grand plans for our place when we moved in but the job loss has put most on hold. We have however, managed to get a good garden in and are slowly gaining ground. The slower process has let Mother Nature take a greater hand and it’s been very interesting to watch our great bare patch of dirt turn into a nice meadow with very little input from us. The deer love to hang out there and we even had a duck visit our seasonal pond/mud puddle the last few days. We’ve planted native flowers in one of the remaining bare spots, so am hoping to get more bees and butterflies. A little at a time, but it’s getting done!

Serenity at Bloedel Reserve

A few weeks ago, we made it out to Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island. Bloedel is one of those in-your-backyard sort of places that we always seem to put off. It’s going to be too crowded, it’s too expensive, it’s just a garden, we’ll do it another time, it’s not adventurous enough, it will always be there. I have talked about going for years but always came up with an excuse. I am so glad we finally went.

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Bloedel is not just a garden. It’s 150 acres of spectacular scenery, both wild and groomed, and full of life, even in the middle of February. We saw ducks, geese, a Pileated Woodpecker, and a number of smaller birds. Heard a raven and frogs. Saw a deer and a coyote. Flowers were already blooming–hellebores, camellias, primroses, and others. As beautiful as it was on the overcast, chilly day that we went, I can only imagine what it will be like in April or May.

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We enjoyed it so much that we went back to the admissions desk and bought a year-long pass for the two of us, plus two guests. Well worth the $100 (plus you get a 10 percent discount at the gift shop, which has a lovely selection of local art and things–and where else can you find squirrel earrings!). I plan on going back once a month to chronicle the changes throughout the seasons.

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There is lots of information on their website and at the Reserve so I won’t tell you all about it here. Part of the fun is reading about the history in the lovely home on the grounds. There are a number of special events throughout the year, or you can just go for a walk on your own. It took the three of us almost three hours (although some of that was in the gift shop!). We were constantly stopping to marvel at some beautiful plant or scene, but there were also people who live a little closer who use the Reserve for a brisk walk for exercise. I think I would do that if I lived on Bainbridge as well!

PS: Do be aware that pets are not allowed, and they will not let you keep one in your car while you visit (good for them!).

http://bloedelreserve.org/

 

Moving On

This is a difficult blog post to write, as a part of me feels like I am giving up. But actually, this is about moving on, and there is a big difference. We are often told that if we can find a job doing what we love, we will never have to “work.” The idea being of course, that your work will be fun and won’t seem like work. This is a wonderful concept that works very well for some people, but not for all of us. Sometimes, the thing that we love needs to be our escape, sometimes it truly needs to remain the thing we do for fun–only for fun. Even if you are successful, as many are, in making a living at the thing you love, there is a change the minute you begin to monetize that thing–maybe it’s cooking, writing, music. For me, it’s photography.

I have been involved with photography since I was a child who took horrible photos with my little Brownie camera (yes, I’m that old). I took photography classes in high school and majored in photojournalism. For years, I wanted to be a horse show photographer. I finally made the plunge about ten years ago. For a few years it worked. I enjoyed it and made a little money, though never a profit. I had to stop for some health reasons, among other things, and spent the next several years trying different aspects of the photo business. Nothing really worked, as far as making it a go as a business. There are many reasons (most of them my own fault), and I won’t go into that (I have friends who know exactly what I am feeling) because that’s not the point of this post.

When I was younger, I always felt that I had to finish a book, even if it wasn’t good. As I got older, I realized that it wasn’t worth the time. I have reached that point with my photography. It is no longer worth the time, and more importantly, the money needed to make a business work. Regardless of any other aspects (such as marketing, which I am remarkably awful at managing), photography is a spendy business, with technology constantly changing. It’s not just the cameras, but the software, the computer needed to run everything, the website, taxes, etc. I simply can’t afford it anymore–as a business.

For all my friends who are saying “no, don’t do it!”, I am not giving up photography, just the business. It’s been an albatross around my neck and it’s time to let go. I will be selling my Canon DSLR equipment (anyone interested??), and going mirrorless, which means lighter, which means I will take my camera out more, which means more fun. Life is too short to keep at something that isn’t working. Let go and move on.

Salmon at Twanoh

It’s been a pretty quiet autumn so far. We’ve had the normal shit going on and some illnesses and injuries to recover from. In fact, I am just getting over my latest injury. It finally happened–one of the cats tried to take me out. He bolted under my legs and literally knocked me off my feet. I fell and hit my knee and chin on the floor (always graceful). When he realized it was the food lady he almost killed, I think he actually felt remorse and spent some time trying to make amends. I now shuffle my feet whenever he is around.

We were able to get out for a few very local trips in the last few weeks. When one lives near Hood Canal, local is just fine. Especially at this time of year. Maples turning yellow and spreading a lovely carpet of gold everywhere (I can say that because we don’t have any and I don’t have to rake!). Mist rising off the still waters on the Canal. Birds of all kinds everywhere. And my favorite–the return of the salmon. Watching the salmon run is fascinating–both beautiful and sad. It makes me feel closer to nature to be able to witness such a marvelous thing.

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Twanoh State Park is the perfect place to watch the Chum Salmon returning to spawn. It is a little jewel of a park, right on the water. The campground itself is across the road, tucked into a narrow canyon with the river running down one side and a trail going up the river. On the water side, there is a big beach and roped off swimming area, picnic tables, restrooms, and a boat ramp. It’s a great place for camping, a short hike, a swim on a hot day, kayaking whenever the water is calm, and even just a quick stop to watch the sunset. And right now you can get a closeup view of the salmon. But do it soon because it will start to get a little smelly soon!

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http://parks.state.wa.us/294/Twanoh

The Elwha Loop

First of all, a big thank you to those of you who have stayed with us! We did not, quite, drop off the face of the earth–just had to sit back and weather the storm for a bit. On the plus side, Jim has made an incredible recovery from his second-degree burn. I really thought he might be out for the whole summer, but he has almost completely healed. As long as he slathers 50+ sunscreen on his leg, he is good to go!

One of latest adventures was the Elwha Loop just past Port Angeles. Because of Jim’s injuries, we haven’t done as much this summer and we were looking for something not too strenuous. This was a great hike–quite easy and very beautiful. A bit of a drive for us but easily done in a day.

One of the things that struck me most about this hike was how quiet it was. This is an easy hike in the Olympics, and we went on a Friday in late July–prime tourist time. And yet we saw very few people on the hike–just the way I like it!! Contrast that with a recent hike to Lake Serene in the Cascades, also on a July Friday, which was like I-5 at rush hour through Seattle. More on that adventure later! This is described on some sites as a heavily trafficked trail, so we may have just been lucky, or maybe some people are still not sure what’s going on after the removal of the dams on the Elwha. Whatever the reason for the lack of people, it worked out for us!

The trail itself was well maintained and shady most of the way (we also lucked out with weather and had an overcast and cool-for-summer day). We took the lower part of the loop to start and made the very short and definitely worth it detour to Goblins Gate, which is stunning! The color of the water is spectacular. Could get really crowded very fast, but we saw only two others people there. Perfect!

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Another detour worth making is the Dodger Point Trail to the suspension bridge over the  Elwha. This is another beautiful spot–nice place for a bit of lunch if you didn’t already have it at Humes Ranch. You can check out Michael’s Cabin on the way back, though it appears that local rowdies party there. The sign out front said you might be able to find remnants of spearmint in the garden. I just found some skivies and nasty old socks. I think someone had too much fun there. Lots of rat poop on the porch too, so be careful where you sit. You are more daring than I am if you choose to climb the ladder and look in the loft!

All in all, it was a good hike. Worth the drive. No blisters either!!

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Explore Your Creative Side

I am a photographer. I enjoy most types of photography but am especially drawn to abstracts. I love the idea of capturing moods and the fluidity of time rather than freezing moments. If you are a creative type, you know how much your work can nurture your soul. But creativity can ebb and flow, and nothing puts a screeching halt to it quite like an unexpected disaster and the depression that can come with it.

My husband lost his job over a year ago. It wasn’t the only major setback we had at the time and all things together took quite a toll. I didn’t pick up my camera for months. I finally went to a counselor and I can tell you, it made all the difference in the world. She encouraged me to start shooting again–slowly, just for myself. I think that’s the key. Do it just for you. We tend to be our own worst critics, so don’t try too hard. Just do it. You can delete, rip it up, throw it away, but don’t give up.

Keep a journal of your feelings. You don’t have to show it to anyone, but if you are going through problems with someone else, it might be a good way to show how you feel when spoken words don’t always come out the way you want. A friend of mine is also having a very difficult time. She gave me some great advice. She draws in her journal, as she is an artist, but she was getting caught up with the whole perfection thing. The solution–use crayons!! You can’t be perfect with crayons, plus they are fun and might just put a smile on your face (get the big box!). If you are a photographer like me, you can sketch out ideas for shoots. A writer can use them too. Filling a whole page with pen or pencil can be daunting, but write big with those crayons and that page will fill up quickly. Let your inner child out and begin to feel joy in your art again.