Salmon at Twanoh

It’s been a pretty quiet autumn so far. We’ve had the normal shit going on and some illnesses and injuries to recover from. In fact, I am just getting over my latest injury. It finally happened–one of the cats tried to take me out. He bolted under my legs and literally knocked me off my feet. I fell and hit my knee and chin on the floor (always graceful). When he realized it was the food lady he almost killed, I think he actually felt remorse and spent some time trying to make amends. I now shuffle my feet whenever he is around.

We were able to get out for a few very local trips in the last few weeks. When one lives near Hood Canal, local is just fine. Especially at this time of year. Maples turning yellow and spreading a lovely carpet of gold everywhere (I can say that because we don’t have any and I don’t have to rake!). Mist rising off the still waters on the Canal. Birds of all kinds everywhere. And my favorite–the return of the salmon. Watching the salmon run is fascinating–both beautiful and sad. It makes me feel closer to nature to be able to witness such a marvelous thing.

IMG_1066twanohblogIMG_1073

Twanoh State Park is the perfect place to watch the Chum Salmon returning to spawn. It is a little jewel of a park, right on the water. The campground itself is across the road, tucked into a narrow canyon with the river running down one side and a trail going up the river. On the water side, there is a big beach and roped off swimming area, picnic tables, restrooms, and a boat ramp. It’s a great place for camping, a short hike, a swim on a hot day, kayaking whenever the water is calm, and even just a quick stop to watch the sunset. And right now you can get a closeup view of the salmon. But do it soon because it will start to get a little smelly soon!

IMG_1123twanohblogIMG_1115twanohblog

http://parks.state.wa.us/294/Twanoh

Comments Concerning Cairns and the Tedious Business of Huckleberries

Last month we found ourselves in Moab, Utah, for a week of hiking and quad/dirt bike riding with friends. I had my first quad trial by fire (i.e.; ride, which was supposed to be easy, except for the hair-raising ride up and down the incredibly rocky, narrow ledge that passed as a road) but prefer the quiet moments out in nature so Jim and I did some hiking as well. Our last hike of the trip was to the Fisher Towers along the Colorado River just NE of Moab. Stunningly beautiful territory and a hike we would heartily recommend to anyone planning a trip to the area. Do watch the weather, which comes in quick (as it does here in the NW). We were keeping an eye on some thunder and rain storms that pretty much split the formation we were hiking. (The lyrics from King of the Mountain kept going through my head! “Mountain in the shadow of light, rain in the valley below”–Midnight Oil). Wind was wild in places, and really caught everyone off guard as we came around a corner to one of the popular stopping points–from perfectly calm to wind that blew the glasses right off my face and sent someone’s backpack tumbling back down the trail. I basically dropped and clung to the bare rock for fear of following my glasses over the edge. But the wind did die down and Jim was safely able to rescue both glasses and backpack. The trail ends on a similar windy, bare, exposed rock with an incredible view. I crawled up it; Jim of course stood right at the edge.

This hike, in addition to being amazing in so many ways, was also interesting in that much of the trail is marked with cairns. We usually do relatively easy day hikes here in the Olympics and the only cairns I see on a regular basis are often found along our rocky riverbeds, where the rocks practically beg to be stacked. However, I now see exactly why experienced back country hikers hate to see cairns that are made for no reason. They really do make a difference is some areas. When you are hiking across hard, bare rock, they may be the only way to mark a trail. Randomly piling up rocks can send people off in the completely wrong direction. So if you love them, make one, take a photo, and then take it down, or make them in your own yard.

On a completely different subject, we returned to huckleberry season in the NW. These are not my favorite berries to eat right off the plant, but they are wonderful in pancakes, muffins, and other such things. They are also free and in great abundance on our property. With our meagre income, who are we to turn down free food? On the flip side, free is not necessarily easy. I see why someone in the area is charging $9 for a half-pint of the berries. After several days of picking and sorting (which is way worse than the picking), I think she was undercharging! They are lots of work. But my stash in the freezer is growing and I will keep at it until they are gone for the year. We will all be glad in mid-winter! Tomorrow we tackle the mountain of green tomatoes in the kitchen.

IMG_0906berriesblog

Close to Home

Last week we took a short trip to Mason Lake with the kayaks. I had wanted to go to Twanoh, thinking that Mason Lake was just the slough out to the big lake. Beautiful but full of boats and often rough. Thankfully, Jim talked me into the lake. Little did I know the wonders of the lagoon and creek off to the left of the boat ramp. Lily pads, herons, ducks, flowers, and absolute tranquility awaited us. We even headed down a little creek, with a definite flow and a bit of a paddle back! Too far down and you lose your head in a culvert under the road. We didn’t get that far! But what a gorgeous day. Never underestimate the little secrets close to home. Sometimes the best adventures are fifteen minutes away.

That little adventure can be all that it takes to reset your balance in life. You don’t always need an exotic trip or an intense hike in the mountains. Take that path across the street, bike that easy trail you always pass up, kayak that little lagoon. Find yourself in those small moments of beauty and peace. Namaste!

 

 

#masonlake #kayakingadventures #stillwaters

 

 

Disc Golfing in March

Western Washington springs are usually pretty wet, but this one is starting off to be a whopper. Walking in my yard is like walking on a giant sponge. The dirt access road behind our property still looks like you could kayak on it–it even has some mild rapids. Trails in the area sometimes look more like creeks. If you are hiking out and about in this weather, bring extra clothes, especially shoes and socks!

Mother Nature did give us a lovely little break on Saturday and we jumped at the chance to get away for an afternoon. Jim had a shoulder surgery and two wrist surgeries recently, so he hasn’t been able to enjoy one his favorite past times–disc golf. We also haven’t been on many hikes lately so we combined the two and headed up to Hoodsport Hills, on the way to Lake Cushman.

The whole area around Lake Cushman is beautiful, with trails galore, but Jim has wanted to check out the new (and still unfinished) disc golf course that we always pass on our way up to Staircase. We arrived late morning with the sun working hard to warm us up, though layers were necessary to start with. There is a parking lot with a surprisingly clean and well stocked port-a-potty (always good to know for us ladies!). The course starts on the near side of a lovely little creek and continues on into the forest. So far, there are only nine holes completed and they are not in order (you go from hole 5 to 15)! Signs can be confusing, as they still have lots of work to do. Your best bet is to go to DGCourse Review and print out their 2016 review. Jim found it very descriptive and helpful.

I don’t play disc golf, but I do like to tag along, as the scenery is often very nice. This one is by far the prettiest course I have been on. It would be a nice area just to hike around, and in fact, there is a trailhead for some very short hikes nearby. The hikes and course cross over each other a few times. We saw eagles flying overhead and several small woodpeckers in the trees. Jim loved the course and is looking forward to its completion. I will certainly go back when he plays, just for the walk. As far as a disc golf course, I will say this–it doesn’t look like the easiest course in the world! If you love the game, I think you will enjoy this course. It seemed fairly challenging to me, and at this point, most of the underbrush hasn’t leafed out yet. When it does, it’s going to be even more difficult. There is also the creek, which Jim had to fish a disc out of! It’s running rapidly right now, so we’re pretty happy he found it.

For those who don’t know much about disc golf, here are some good resources to check out:

http://www.wsdga.org

http://www.dgcoursereview.com/reviews.php?id=8481&mode=rev

http://www.pdga.com

It’s a fun and inexpensive way to enjoy the outdoors.